Teddy Roosevelt Terrier

Teddy Roosevelt Terrier

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The Teddy Roosevelt Terrier is a dog breed. It is a terrier formerly known as a Type B or Short Legged Rat Terrier.  The Teddy Roosevelt Terrier is a North American dog breed recognized by the United Kennel Club. It is a terrier formerly known as a Type B or Short Legged Rat Terrier. Several independent organizations maintain Type B Rat Terrier registries and it is common to see the terms Type B Rat Terrier and Teddy Roosevelt Terrier applied to the same general dog type.

When the types were separated, the new breed was named in honor of U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt as it is believed that he owned this type of ratting terrier.

Appearance: The Teddy Roosevelt Terrier is a sturdy dog in the preferred length-to-height ratio of 10:7 or 10:8. It comes in a variety of colours and markings but must have some white; a solid white dog is acceptable. Merles and any solid coloured coat other than white are disqualified.  The Teddy Roosevelt Terrier is a sturdy dog in the preferred length-to-height ratio of 10:7 or 10:8 with a height of roughly 8 to 15 inches. It comes in a variety of colors and markings including bicolors (any combination of black, tan, chocolate, red, orange, lemon, or blue with white)and tricolors (black, tan, and white) but must have some white; a solid white dog is acceptable. 

Colored areas may be brindle or have sable overlay. Merles and any solid coloured coat other than white are disqualified. A square or long-legged dog is disqualified. The dog has a broad wedge-shaped head, v-shaped ears button or erect, slightly oval feet, and a docked tail is preferred (though some are naturally bobbed). The tail is long and curved when it is not docked or bobbed. A scissor bite is preferred but a level bite is acceptable. The breed standard specifies that the dog is to be evaluated as a working terrier and hence ‘honorable scars’ (those received in the field) are not to be penalized.

A square or long-legged dog is disqualified. The dog has a broad wedge-shaped head, v-shaped ears button or erect, slightly oval feet, and a docked tail is preferred. A scissor bite is preferred but a level bite is acceptable.The breed standard specifies that the dog is to be evaluated as a working terrier and hence ‘honorable scars’ (those received in the field) are not to be penalized. The Teddy Roosevelt Terrier was recognized by the United Kennel Club on January 1, 1999.

The Teddy has a temperament very similar to that of the rat terrier and many other terriers. It is a lively, feisty, and active dog that is friendly and affectionate towards its family and friends including children but may be aloof or reserved towards strangers. Like many other terriers, the breed can be quite fearless, challenging dogs more than twice its size.

However, like the rat terrier, they are not as active or aggressive as the Jack Russell Terrier. While they have a definite terrier personality, they also have an “off switch” and love lounging on the sofa in a lap as much as tearing about the yard. They are normally cheerful dogs but they tend to be more sensitive than Jack Russells to changes in their environment, owner’s moods, or to unexpected noises, people, and activities. This “social sensitivity” makes them very trainable and easier than Jack Russells to live with for the average pet owner. Like most active and intelligent breeds, they enjoy receiving a great deal of mental stimulation and exercise.

Many of the breed retain their hunting abilities, so it essential for puppies to receive early socialization with other smaller pets, such as cats, birds or fish, if they are to live together. Some may also need socialization with children.

While the dog can adapt to urban life, it has a moderate to high energy level and as a result should receive ample exercise and plenty of activity. Unlike Jack Russell terriers though, the dog is happy to sit in a person’s lap for some down time, making them better candidates for city life.

Less common problems may include allergies, bite problems (malocclusions), hip dysplasia, and elbow dysplasia as these are problems that appear in the dog’s cousin, the rat terrier.

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